Pumpkins

Pumpkins grown for decoration (such as jack o’lanterns) are not suitable for eating; look for “pie pumpkins” or “sugar pumpkins” for baking. To save effort on a pumpkin pie without giving up your good home-made flavor, avoid the canned pumpkin pie filling and look for plain canned pumpkin puree (the label may say things like “unsweetened” and “100% pumpkin”), to which you can then add whatever your favorite recipe calls for.

You should also to be aware that squash of all kinds cross readily with any gourds growing in the area. Avoid squash with “warts” on the skin (compare a normal pumpkin with one of the “knucklehead” ones to see what I’m talking about). Warty squash are likely to have taste and/or texture issues.

Dry milk

If you only use small amounts of milk, dry milk can be the way to go. Most milk powders mix in the same ratio, one part powder to four parts water. That means you can mix up a cup of milk using 1/4 cup of dry milk, or my favorite amount, a tablespoon of powder to 1/4 cup of water. Mix that up first, drop in three eggs and cinnamon to taste, and make about 6 slices of French toast (or, as it was called in medieval England, pan purdy).

As a side note, if you do have to drink the stuff, mix it up the day before and let it sit in the fridge overnight to dissolve more thoroughly.

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“Tired” greens

You can rehydrate droopy greens by letting them sit in cold water for an hour or three. Be sure to drain them well before putting them away, though. This can work for certain other vegetables as well.

Many leaf vegetables such as lettuce store longer if there’s a little bit of water at the bottom of the bag so the stem(s) can “drink,” but the leaves must be kept clear of it or they’ll rot. In some cases, like with asparagus, this is best achieved by putting them in a rigid container with a little water in the bottom, vase-style. Unless you’re going to use it right away, though, drop a plastic bag over the whole thing to keep the moisture in.

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Thank You!

We had a blast and we hope you did too.

Thank you customers! Thank you sponsors!  Thank you vendors, and thank you volunteers!

A farmers market does not happen by accident.  It happens because a group of people, like-minded people, come together, roll up their sleeves, and put in hours of hard work.

We think the hard work paid off.  We hope you agree!

See you in 2018!

Three onion soup

1 teaspoon olive oil
4 medium leeks (white and pale green parts, about 2 cups), chopped
1 small onion (1/4 pound), thinly sliced
2 large shallots (1/4 pound), thinly sliced
salt and pepper to taste
1 1/2 cups water
1 large potato (6 ounces) such as Yukon Gold, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 cup chicken broth
1/2 cup grated Gruyère (2 ounces)
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Heat oil over moderate heat until hot but not smoking; add leeks, onion, and shallots and season to taste. Cook about 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until edges are golden brown. Add 1/2 cup water and deglaze skillet, scraping up brown bits. Add potato, broth, and remaining cup water to onions. Simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are very tender.

Pour about 1 cup of soup into blender, puree, and return to pot. Adjust seasonings and serve sprinkled with cheese and drizzled with vinegar.

Makes about 4 cups.

Adapted from Gourmet (via the Epicurious website).

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Versión en español: this post is also available in Spanish.
Esperanta traduko: this post is also available in Esperanto, because Dana is a language geek.

This Is It!

Farewells are always bittersweet, and tomorrow will be no exception.

We say goodbye for the 2017 season tomorrow.

You know who our vendors are, and by now you know what we sell.

So we’ll just say we hope to see you tomorrow, from 10-2, on the last day of the Tumwater Town Center Farmers Market.  It’s been one heck of a season and we want to thank you in person.

And if you have any suggestions for next year’s market, please stop by the info booth and let us now your ideas.

Zucchini & Corn Souffle

2 medium zucchini (about 1 1/2 pounds)
2 1/2 tsp. salt
6 eggs, separated
2 medium ears corn, shucked
2 green onions, chopped
6 Tbsp. butter
6 Tbsp. flour
1/4 tsp. black pepper
1 1/4 cups milk
1/2 cup shredded Swiss cheese

Shred zucchini and place in a colander over a plate or in the sink; toss with 1 tsp. salt. Let stand 30 minutes. Rinse, drain, and blot dry. Separate eggs and let stand at room temperature 30 minutes. Boil corn, covered, 3-5 minutes or until crisp-tender; drain. Let cool slightly and cut corn from cobs. Cook onions and zucchini in butter, stirring, until tender. Stir in flour, pepper, and remaining salt until blended. Gradually stir in milk and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook 1-2 minutes, until sauce thickens. Add to corn and stir in cheese. Stir a small amount of zucchini mixture into egg yolks to temper; return all to bowl, stirring constantly. Allow to cool slightly. Beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Gently stir a fourth of the egg whites into zucchini mixture, then fold in remaining egg whites. Transfer to a greased and floured 2 1/2-qt. souffle dish. Bake at 350F 45-50 minutes, until top is puffed and center appears set.

Adapted from Taste of Home, June/July 2014 via Taste of Home.com

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Versión en español: this post is also available in Spanish.
Esperanta traduko: this post is also available in Esperanto, because Dana is a language geek.