Radish leaves are edible

Radish Top Soup

1 large onion, diced
2 Tbsp. butter
2 medium potatoes, sliced
4 cups radish greens
4 cups chicken broth
1/3 cup heavy cream
5 radishes, sliced, for garnish

Saute onion in butter over medium heat until tender. Add potatoes and radish greens, stirring to coat with butter. Add chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. Allow to cool slightly and blend until smooth (depending on the size of your blender, you may need to work in batches). Return to saucepan and stir in cream. Reheat, stirring, until well blended; do not boil. Top with radish slices.

Adapted from Mother Nature Network

Radish Leaf Pesto

2 large handsful fresh radish leaves, stems removed
30 grams (1 ounce) grated or shaved hard cheese such as pecorino or parmesan
30 grams (1 ounce) nuts such as pistachios, almonds, or pinenuts (walnuts are not recommended, the result is bitter)
1 clove garlic, germ removed, quartered
a short ribbon of lemon zest, without pith (optional)
2 Tbsp. olive oil, plus more for consistency
salt
pepper
ground chili pepper

Pulse in a food processor or blender until smooth, scraping the sides as needed. Add more oil and pulse to mix until desired consistency is reached. Adjust seasonings and store in an airtight container. Use or freeze within a few days.

Adapted from Chocolate & Zucchini

More radish and radish top recipes:
Radishes with creamy ricotta
Buttered Leeks and Radishes

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Rhubarb muffins

1/4 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup oil
1 egg
2 tsp. vanilla
1 cup buttermilk
1 1/2 cup diced rhubarb
1/2 cup chopped nuts (optional)
1/2 tsp. salt
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda

topping:
1/3 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1 Tbsp. melted butter

Beat together brown sugar, oil, egg, and vanilla until well blended. Stir in buttermilk, rhubarb, and nuts. Combine salt, flour, baking powder, and baking soda; add all at once to rhubarb mixture and stir until just mixed. Fill greased muffin pans 2/3 full. Combine topping ingredients and sprinkle over muffins. Bake at 400F for 20 minutes or until done. Makes 2 dozen.

Source unknown.

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Braised Salmon with Leeks

2 medium leeks (white and lower green parts only)
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 Tbsp. + 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth
2 Tbsp. lemon juice
1 Tbsp. fresh tarragon, chopped
1-1/2 lbs salmon fillet, skin and bones removed, in 8 pieces
salt and white pepper to taste

Cut leeks in half lengthwise, fan out, and rinse well. Cut leeks into 2-inch lengths, then slice lengthwise into very thin strips (chiffonade). Heat 1 Tbsp. broth and sauté leeks over medium heat about 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Add garlic and sauté for another minute. Add 1/2 cup broth and 1 Tbsp. lemon juice; cover and simmer another 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Rub salmon with remaining 1 Tbsp. lemon juice, salt, and white pepper. Stir fresh tarragon into leeks; place salmon pieces on top. Cover and simmer until salmon is pink inside, about 3-4 minutes.

Serves 4

Adapted from World’s Healthiest Foods

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Leeks

native to: probably Central Asia
in season here: fall through early spring

Leeks, Allium ampeloprasum (Leek Group), are members of the Amaryllidaceae family, related to onions and garlic. They have plenty of kaempferol, which protects blood vessel linings. Another way leeks protect blood vessels is with their high concentrations of polyphenols (garlic and onions have more, but leeks are still up there). They also provide lots of folate in a bioactive form, meaning you’re not only eating this B vitamin, you’re absorbing it and getting that cardiovascular support. Leeks’ flavonoids are more abundant in the bulbs and lower leaves, which is the part most commonly used. They also contain compounds which convert to allicin after the leek is cut or crushed; allicin reduces cholesterol formation (how about some leeks in that omelet?), reduces blood vessel stiffness, lowers blood pressure, and has anti-microbial functions. Leeks also provide the important vitamins pyridoxine, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, and vitamins A, C, and E. Their good fiber content makes them helpful for weight loss.

Ancient Greeks and Romans ate leeks to benefit the throat and make the voice stronger, and the Romans introduced them into many of the colder areas of their empire. The leek is the national symbol of Wales; according to some sources this is because of their use in a battle against Saxon invaders in 1620, but sources I find more credible trace the presence and importance of leeks in Wales into far earlier times.

Read more:
label-style nutrition information for raw leeks
label-style nutrition information for boiled leeks
Nutrition and You
Organic Gardening News and Info

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Braised scallions

10 scallions, trimmed, with about 1 inch of green remaining
2 tsp. olive oil
2 Tbsp. chicken broth
salt and pepper to taste
2 Tbsp. crème fraîche or sour cream

Toss scallions with oil and broth to coat; adjust seasonings. Place scallions in a gratin dish or toaster oven tray and bake in preheated toaster oven at 425F about 10 minutes, or until tips are slightly blackened. Top with crème fraîche and serve hot.

Adapted from: The gourmet toaster oven : simple and sophisticated meals for the busy cook / Lynn Alley. Ten Speed Press, c2005. 9780385364331.

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Dandelion greens

native to: possibly the Central Asian region
in season here: greens are best in the spring, roots in the fall
DSCF1809_700
Dandelions are related to sunflowers, daisies, and thistles, and appear in medical texts as early as the 10th century. Folk medicine uses dandelions to purify the blood, improve digestion, and prevent piles and gall stones. The flower stems are a traditional soother for burns and nettle stings. The roots are sometimes roasted for use as a coffee substitute, a preparation sometimes recommended for balancing blood sugar. The leaves are best known as a salad ingredient, but can also be used in soups, casseroles, juices, and smoothies, or just cooked like spinach or chard. Dandelion greens can have a somewhat acrid flavor, which can be reduced by blanching for 20-30 seconds then immersing in icewater to stop the cooking process. The leaves can also be dried for use in tonics and teas.

Dandelion greens are very high in vitamin K, which strengthens bones and may fight Alzheimer’s. They are abundant in vitamin A, an antioxidant which is particularly good for the skin, eyes, and mucus membranes. They also have fiber, vitamins C and B6, thiamin, riboflavin, calcium, iron, potassium, manganese, folate, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, cobalt, zinc, boron, and molybdenum. Rather ironic, isn’t it, that my parents once had a conniption when I tried to eat dandelion greens out of the lawn? Although, considering all the chemicals they put on that lawn, perhaps those particular greens were dangerous….

Research indicates that dandelion roots or their extract may be useful in treating cancer, including leukemia. Dandelion greens may prove useful in treating jaundice, cirrhosis, edema, gout, eczema, acne, AIDS, and herpes. Dandelion extract has been linked to weight loss and used in dental research as an antiplaque preparation. Dandelion pollen has antibacterial effects.

Dandelions contain compounds known to have laxative and diuretic effects, so they would probably be a good addition to a detox regimen (but maybe not the best choice right before a long car trip). Also, that high potassium level can be a problem for people on certain medications.

Read more:
label-style nutrition information for raw dandelion greens
label-style nutrition information for cooked dandelion greens
mercola.com
leaflady.org
instructions for dandelion root coffee from leaflady.org

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Dandelion and Fennel Salad

1 bunch dandelion greens, finely chopped
1/2 fennel bulb, thinly sliced
2 cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage
1/2 cup bean sprouts or sunflower shoots

Dressing:
juice of 1 lemon
1 Tbsp. mirin
1/8 tsp. sesame oil
1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
1 tsp. tamari soy sauce
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1/4 tsp. maple syrup or honey

Combine dressing ingredients; toss lightly with greens.

Adapted from: Healthy Recipes for Your Nutritional Type by Dr. Mercola, as posted on mercola.com

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