Curried Mustard Greens & Garbanzos with Sweet Potatoes

2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled, in 1/2-inch slices
1 medium onion, peeled, halved, and thinly sliced
3 medium cloves garlic, minced or crushed
1 Tbsp. + 1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth
1/2 tsp. curry powder
1/4 tsp. turmeric
1 bunch mustard greens, chopped, stems removed
15 oz. canned diced tomatoes
2 cups garbanzo beans (15 oz can), drained
3 Tbsp. olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Steam sweet potatoes in 2 inches of water in a steamer with a tightly-fitting lid, about 7 minutes. Sauté onion in 1 Tbsp. broth over medium heat, stirring frequently, until translucent, about 4-5 minutes. Add 1/4 cup broth, garlic, curry powder, turmeric, and mustard greens. Cook, stirring occasionally, until mustard greens are wilted, about 5 minutes. Add garbanzos and diced tomatoes, and adjust seasonings. Cook 5 minutes more. Mash sweet potatoes with olive oil, salt, and pepper; add broth to thin if needed. Serve together.

Adapted from World’s Healthiest Foods

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Versión en español: this post is also available in Spanish.
Esperanta traduko: this post is also available in Esperanto, because Dana is a language geek.

Mustard greens

native to: Himalayan region
in season here: winter and spring
DSCF1815_700
Mustard, Brassica juncea, is another cruciferous vegetable, and the greens are noted for their cholesterol-lowering effects (especially when steamed) and their protection against cancer and inflammation. Mustard greens are a valuable detoxifier, providing antioxidants, sulfurous compounds, and phytonutrients that regulate detoxification enzymes. They provide copper, calcium, manganese and vitamins C, E, K, and A.

Mustard greens have been eaten for over 5000 years and feature in Chinese, Indian, and Southern cuisine. They add a strong, peppery accent to salads, soups, stir-fries, and juices. Regular consumption of mustard greens is reputed to protect against arthritis, osteoporosis, iron deficiency anemia, cardiovascular diseases, and asthma.

Reheating mustard greens can cause the nitrates to convert to nitrites and nitrosamines if certain bacteria are present, so it’s best to go ahead and eat them all the first time. Also, the high levels of vitamin K can interfere with anti-coagulants, mustard greens contain oxalic acid, and they have a reputation as a “goitrogenic” food that may cause trouble for those with thyroid problems.

Read more:
label-style nutrition information for raw mustard greens
label-style nutrition information for cooked mustard greens
vegetarian.about.com
Health Benefits Times

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Balsamic-Glazed Chickpeas and Mustard Greens

1/2 large red onion, thinly sliced
4-6 Tbsp. vegetable broth
4 cloves garlic, chopped
pinch red pepper flakes
10 oz. mustard greens, torn into bite-sized pieces, heavy stems removed
2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar, plus extra for serving
1/2 tsp. soy sauce
1/4 tsp. sugar
1 cup cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained

Sauté the onion in 1-2 Tbsp. vegetable broth until mostly faded to pink, about 4 minutes. Add chopped garlic, red pepper, and another Tbsp. of broth and cook, stirring, for another minute. Add mustard greens and another 2 Tbsp. of broth; cook, stirring, until greens are wilted but still bright green, about 3-5 minutes. Remove greens and onions from pan with a slotted spoon and place in a serving dish. Add enough broth to pan liquids to make about 2 Tbsp. Stir in balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, and sugar. Add the chickpeas and cook, stirring, over medium heat until the liquid is reduced by about half. Spoon the chickpeas over the greens and drizzle with sauce. Serve warm, with additional balsamic vinegar on the table.

Adapted from fatfreevegan.com

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Versión en español: this post is also available in Spanish.Esperanta traduko: this post is also available in Esperanto, because Dana is a language geek.